Instagram and the Artist’s Blog

Example of how I used a screenshot to promote a recent blog post on Instagram.

Imagine you’re an artist–a painter, specifically. Some months back, you set up a blog as a way to promote your work. A blog is a way to carve out virtual real estate, you reasoned, believing a lack of online presence was tantamount to non-existence. And these days, setting up a decent site costs relatively little and requires minimal learning . You told family and friends about it, and after excruciating deliberation over fonts and background colors, you finally published your first post: an artist statement accompanied by a couple of high-resolution photos of recent paintings. The world was opening up to you . . . or was it? You consistently generate brilliant content, but your readership has never approached what you thought it would. Luckily, a great tool for driving visitors to your site is probably already on your phone’s home screen: Instagram.

Chances are you have an Instagram account. Yet there’s also a chance you’re not maximizing Instagram’s potential for growing your brand. Perhaps you’ve never considered the photo-sharing platform as a marketing tool. Of course, you’ve posted pictures of your paintings here and there, and maybe you’ve even been encouraged by a few positive responses, but you know the response could be bigger. In fact, you need it to be bigger. Your dreams are at stake.

So you’ve shared your creative pursuits on Instagram, but what you haven’t done is learn how to leverage Instagram’s networking potential to drive visitors to your site–the true online showcase for your paintings. Good news: this can be achieved by sharing the blog itself. It’s the difference between simply letting people know you paint and showing them you’re a serious artist. If you share your site in this way, you’ll be surprised to learn how many of your followers haven’t realized you even have a blog, despite the link being right there in your Instagram bio. Everybody’s busy, so it sometimes takes an extra nudge to aim their attention in the proper direction.

Let’s look at some ways to share your blog via Instagram. First, never forget that Instagram is primarily a photo-sharing platform. This means your photo should be of good quality, even if it means using filters and effects (think of it as creative control). Everyone has seen the way professional photographers use Instagram to display their work. If you want your post to garner a second look, keep in mind the amazing quality out there.  Also, your photo should relate directly to the content of your blog post: an actual photo from the post is ideal. Here’s a different approach: take a screenshot of your most current blog post and use it as the photo you share on Instagram to promote your blog (see photo at the top of this article); this not only announces your new post, it also allows people a tiny glimpse of the site, which hopefully has the effect of making them curious about what you’re doing.

Next, couple your photo with an excerpt from the particular blog post you are promoting. Use some form of lead-in to indicate that the excerpt was written by you. For example, you can say something like: I updated my blog!, or new post.  You want viewers to know that you are the author. Following your lead-in, use quotation marks to imply that your excerpt is only a small part of a larger published piece online. Your excerpt should reveal just enough to whet a viewer’s interest. Neither over-share nor under-share. Your intuition will guide you in this, and it’s something you improve upon with time.

Here’s a crucial step, but it’s also one that is easily forgotten: after your excerpt, always mention that a link to the full article can be found in your Instagram bio, and then update your Instagram bio’s web link so it actually connects to your new blog post! More times than I care to admit, I’ve forgotten this step, and I can’t help but wonder how many potential visitors I might have missed.

Finally, optimize your hashtags. If you use Instagram, then it’s assumed you know what hashtags are. However, you may not realize how useful they can be in promoting your blog. Instagram allows thirty hashtags per post. Use all of them whenever possible. The goal is to maximize your reach. The hashtag search tool that pops up automatically in Instagram’s iPhone app, which is what I’m most familiar with, typically offers up multiple variations for most entries. For example, if I type #halloween in the text box, these are only a few of the options that appear:  #halloweenmakeup; #halloweencostume; #halloweenmovie; #halloween2018.

Instagram’s hashtag-suggesting function.

Indeed, the list goes on and on. You can’t select all the hashtags, but you can select the most relevant ones. And because Instagram provides a number beside each one indicating how many times that hashtag has been used, you can strategically pick ones where your post has a greater chance of being seen. In other words, if a particular tag has been used eight million times, it’s more likely your post will get lost in the shuffle, but if it’s only been used eight-hundred times, your post is going to be visible for a longer period of time, thereby increasing the chances someone will click on it. And getting someone to click on your post is two-thirds of the battle.

Artists typically don’t want to bother with self-promotion–they’re natural-born makers, not marketers. However, social media has made the process a little less painful. This is fortunate, because an online presence is a necessity in modern times. A blog is a wonderful thing for an artist to have; the ability to update a blog regularly is perhaps the greatest perk of owning one, as opposed to a traditional website. Yet a blog must have visitors if an online presence is to have any meaning. Among the many social media platforms available, Instagram gets my vote for being the one that best lends itself to blog promotion. At least that’s what my own experience suggests.

Alan D. Tucker
Content Writer, Essayist, & Novelist

Feeling Dead Weight Drop

Screaming Face, by Otiart. See more at otiart.deviant.com.

Have you ever driven off with something on top of your car? If you’ve done this, and had the pleasure of hearing said item slide back and down off the roof at sixty miles-per-hour and counting, realizing too late what was happening, then you know the feeling that drops into your gut like dead weight. The feeling hits, and on its heels is the fear that the item is now, quite possibly, irrecoverable. Well, I was able to find my wife’s keychain. It was in the gravel and dry grass of the median on Saturn Parkway (so named for the former Saturn car factory, not the planet), where I nervously searched as vehicles blew past about ten feet away. Finding the keychain would’ve felt like a victory, except most everything previously attached to it was either missing or obliterated.

That was over a year ago. Yesterday, however, the feeling hit again, this time from a different thing feared irrecoverable: this very blog. Doing a little site maintenance, apparently I deleted a file I shouldn’t have. I knew I had no business tampering with those files, but I figured I’d learned enough that I wouldn’t make any fatal mistakes. Wrong! There’s a reason WordPress offers templates: because people like me have no business tinkering with code. Long story short: whatever it was I did to my website removed access to every single post I’d ever published at alandrue.com. I panicked. So much work lost, I thought. This was a minor tragedy. Since I’ve yet to publish with any outside entities, my blog is essentially my writer’s portfolio, and I’m quite happy with some of the posts. But I thought I’d blown it. I thought I was going to have to start over. Thanks to the friendly, understanding, and level-headed technician at GoDaddy (I wish I remembered his name), my site is running flawlessly now, like I never once got trigger-happy with my sacred files. And as I often do, I learned a lesson the hard way. But at least I learned it.

Alan D. Tucker
Content Writer, Essayist, & Novelist

 

**Clarification for those who’ve never owned a blog or website: GoDaddy is the service that provides both my web hosting and my domain security (put simply, they provide my virtual real estate); WordPress is the service through which I built and continue to maintain my blog. There are other approaches. This just happens to be the path I took.

My Renovated Website

Three years ago, I purchased a web domain and named it alandrue.com. I labored through the construction of a very basic site on which to display paintings. Even though I followed a template, there was still a large amount to learn. It took weeks to arrive at something presentable. People who are able to build a site from the ground up are gifted indeed (Justin Bird comes to mind). This is clearly not my skill set, so I am content to make a template look as wonderful as possible. That said, Alan Drue:  Excitable Mind has undergone a significant facelift in recent weeks. Rather than rattle on about the changes made, however, I have decided to post a picture from my brainstorming session.

photo (8)

 

These days I use the site more for writing, especially since going back to school. But whether the intention is to show paintings or share poems, the decision to maintain my own web space is one that I am thrilled to have made. Not because I think the site represents fine design, but because it is all mine. No one tells me what to post. I am my own creative director. This is a freedom that every artist needs. Therefore, I have designated it not as a gallery or blog, but as an online studio. It is like the room at home where I do creative work, surrounded by all of the images and words and objects that inspire me. There is more about that on the “about this online studio” page.

 

Of all the features listed on the journal page above, I am most excited about “categories”. My posts are now organized by subject, and these subjects are listed in the sidebar. I like to imagine that someone checking out my site for the first time sees a category that interests her, so she selects it, and whether a post was published two years ago or two days ago, it will appear on the screen. Posts are no longer lost in the depths of the blog feed. I am similarly enthused about the social media share buttons. Not only do they look nice, but they make sharing easy. And lastly, Alan Drue:  Excitable Mind now has a mobile version. It loads automatically if one accesses the site with a cell phone.

 

So now that the renovation is complete, I am ready to get back to posting. See you on the web.